Policy Briefs & Analyses

These CICW authored policy briefs and analyses provide information on the legal environments and policy landscapes impacting the immigration and child welfare systems.

CICW Statement on Immigration Executive Actions

By | Child Well-Being, Immigrant Youth, Immigration Enforcement, Immigration Relief, Policy Briefs & Analyses

CICW Statement on Immigration Executive Actions

A Product of the CICW Law & Policy Committee (May 2015)

In this position statement, the CICW acknowledges its support for the Obama administration’s expanded deferred action programs and outlines the ways in which expanded deferred action can promote the well-being of children in immigrant families.

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Language Access

By | Child Well-Being, Culture: Issues and Competencies, Immigrant Youth, Language Issues, Policy Briefs & Analyses

Language Access

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD & Caitlin O’Grady, MSW (March 2015)

This brief focuses on language access policies. Research suggests that when child welfare-system involved families do not have access to linguistically appropriate services, successful completion of their case plan is impeded. Language access policies address this issue by outlining agency protocol to ensure that limited English proficient (LEP) families receive appropriate interpretation and translation services.

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Immigration Relief Options for Undocumented Youth in Care

By | Immigrant Youth, Immigration Relief, Policy Briefs & Analyses

Immigration Relief Options for Undocumented Youth in Care

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD & Caitlin O’Grady, MSW (March 2015)

This brief focuses on policies that address immigration relief options for undocumented immigrant youth involved with the child welfare system. Undocumented youth face barriers in accessing services, including educational and employment opportunities, that can have long-term negative impacts on their well-being. Recognizing the challenges that undocumented youth experience in accessing services and opportunities, the policies in this category aim to reduce these barriers by ensuring that child welfare practitioners are aware of available opportunities for youth to gain legal status. The policies discussed throughout this brief both provide staff with an overview of immigration relief options and offer guidance to staff on how they can provide assistance throughout the application process.

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Financial Eligibility including Permanent Residence Under Color of Law (PRUCOL)

By | Child Well-Being, Immigrant Youth, Immigration Relief, Policy Briefs & Analyses

Financial Eligibility including Permanent Residence Under Color of Law (PRUCOL)

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD & Caitlin O’Grady, MSW (March 2015)

This brief focuses on issues related to foster care funding for immigrant youth in care. Undocumented immigrant youth are typically not eligible for federal foster care funding, which may pose challenges for child welfare practitioners. In response to these challenges, the policies in this brief provide guidance to child welfare agency staff on obtaining foster care funds for immigrant youth. Included are policies that outline the procedure for applying for Permanent Residence Under Color of Law (PRUCOL) for undocumented minors. PRUCOL is not an immigration relief option, but rather a process through which undocumented children and youth become eligible for federal foster care funding.

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Placement of Children with Undocumented Relatives in the United States

By | Immigrant Youth, Kinship Care, Policy Briefs & Analyses, Social Work

Placement of Children with Undocumented Relatives in the United States

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD & Caitlin O’Grady, MSW (February 2015)

This brief focuses on policies that address the placement of dependent children with undocumented relatives living in the United States. Although research has found that placing children with relative caregivers can enhance emotional wellbeing, research also suggests that child welfare practitioners often encounter barriers when attempting to place children with undocumented relatives. The policies in this category attempt to reduce these barriers and make placement with undocumented relatives a viable option in cases where such placement is in the best interest of the child in custody.

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Case Planning for Parents Residing in a Foreign Country

By | Family Separation, Immigration Enforcement, Parenting, Policy Briefs & Analyses, State Policies

Case Planning for Parents Residing in a Foreign Country

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD & Caitlin O’Grady, MSW (February 2015)

This brief focuses on policies that address case planning for child welfare system-involved parents residing in a foreign country. Parents face multiple barriers to fulfilling case plan objectives when residing abroad, which in turn poses barriers to family reunification. Policies addressing case planning for parents residing in a foreign country aim to facilitate the process through which child welfare agencies and parents can collaborate transnationally in these cases.

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Placement of Children with Parents or Relatives in a Foreign Country

By | Immigrant Youth, Immigration Relief, Kinship Care, Parenting, Policy Briefs & Analyses

Placement of Children with Parents or Relatives in a Foreign Country

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD & Caitlin O’Grady, MSW (January 2015)

This brief focuses on policies that address the placement of dependent children with a parent or relative residing in a foreign country, typically for the purpose of reunification, guardianship, or adoption.

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Memoranda of Understanding with Foreign Consulates

By | Child Well-Being, Immigrant Youth, Immigration Relief, Language Issues, Policy Briefs & Analyses

Memoranda of Understanding with Foreign Consulates

Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD, & Caitlin O’Grady, MSW (December 2014)

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is an official agreement between a child welfare agency and a foreign consulate that is typically developed to coordinate service delivery for foreign nationals who are involved with the child welfare system. MOUs emerged as a result of recognition from the international community that foreign nationals face barriers to maintaining custody of their children when involved with child welfare agencies.

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