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CICW Research Briefs

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Barriers to Support Service Use for Latino Immigrant Families Reported to Child Welfare: Implications for Policy and Practice

Implications for Policy and PracticeThis brief, authored by Megan Finno-Velasquez at the University of Southern California School of Social Work, highlights the findings of a study that explores the extent to which immigration status impacts referral to, and receipt of, concrete services by Latino families reported for child maltreatment. Data were drawn from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being II (NSCAW II), a federally funded and nationally representative sample of families investigated by child welfare agencies for maltreatment between April 2008 and September 2009. The brief concludes with recommendations for policy and practice.

Download the Brief here


Research Briefs from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being

Findings From the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (Part I)Latino Children of Immigrants in the Child Welfare SystemThe research briefs below report findings from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW) on the characteristics, risk factors, and types of maltreatment in cases involving children of immigrants in the child welfare system.

The findings reported in these briefs represent the first national data available on the presence of children of immigrants in the child welfare system. In addition, these findings identify significant differences in the presence of risk factors and types of maltreatment between children of immigrants and children of U.S.-born parents.

Children of Immigrants in the Child Welfare System: Findings From the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (Part I) by Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD, and Ilze Earner, PhD

Latino Children of Immigrants in the Child Welfare System: Findings From the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (Part II) by Alan J. Dettlaff, PhD, and Ilze Earner, PhD